This week in Concord history
Nov30

This week in Concord history

Dec. 2, 2000: Shortly before 2 p.m. Canterbury Country Store owner Bob Summers rings up his final sale and then shuts the place down. The store will reopen nearly a year later, after members of the community invest several hundred thousand dollars to buy it. Dec. 2, 1774: New Hampshire’s committee of correspondence, formed the previous year to stay in touch with other colonies about acts of the British Parliament, sends a...

Read More
This week in Concord history
Nov22

This week in Concord history

Nov. 23, 2002: The Holiday Magic Parade, which has marked the beginning of the holiday season in Concord for 51 years, marches up Loudon Road in Concord. The procession includes emergency response vehicles, floats, decorated vehicles, equestrian units, clowns, eight marching bands and Santa Claus. Nov. 23, 1911: The New Hampshire Historical Society dedicates its building in Concord. The building was designed by Guy Lowell, also...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Sept 8, 1774: At Portsmouth, an angry mob stones the house of Edward Parry, the tea agent, after learning that, in violation of their boycott, he has allowed the unloading of 30 chests of tea from the mast ship Fox.   Sept. 8, 1679: New Hampshire is declared a separate royal colony.   Sept. 8, 1974: One month after Richard Nixon’s resignation, President Ford pardons him. Retiring U.S. Sen. Norris Cotton of New Hampshire...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Sept. 1, 1782: The Rev. Timothy Walker, who has served as Concord’s Puritan minister from around the time of its settlement in 1730, collapses while preparing for a service and dies. He is 77 years old.   Sept. 1, 1939: Germany attacks Poland. The Concord Monitor’s lead editorial says: “We feel certain that try as hard as we may, we cannot stay out of the war if it is at all prolonged.”   Sept. 2, 1947: Plans to install the...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Aug. 25, 1855: Concord establishes its first public library. The city council appropriates $1,500: “$300 for fixtures, the residue for books.”   Aug. 26, 1988: State Rep. Eugene Daniell Jr. of Franklin, firebrand soapbox orator and former radical, dies at 83. He was one of the first politicians in New Hampshire to call for the resignation of President Richard Nixon.   Aug. 26, 1988: Developers abandon plans for a seven-story...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Aug. 18, 1976: The federal government declares hog cholera under control and lifts a quarantine imposed on swine shipments from Cheshire, Hillsborough and Rockingham counties.   Aug. 19, 2001: Author Philip Roth wins the Edward MacDowell Medal for literature. The award is given by the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, the oldest artists’ colony in the nation.   Aug. 19, 1863: With the Union armies in need of more soldiers,...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Aug. 11, 1766: John Wentworth is appointed governor of New Hampshire by King George II and also “surveyor of the king’s woods in North America.” He will take charge the following summer.   Aug. 12, 2003: Rain pours down on Penacook and Boscawen, filling storm drains and waterways beyond capacity. The storm carries away a 15-foot section of River Road, where a culvert leads into the Contoocook River.   Aug. 12, 1927: In the...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Aug. 4, 1926: It is announced in Conco rd that Allen Hollis, a local lawyer and civic leader known as “The Kingfish,” will donate 11.9 acres on South Fruit Street and $5,000 toward a football field and other athletic facilities. The land will become Memorial Field.   Aug. 4, 1965: Concord begins celebrating its bicentennial with neighborhood fairs, a Bicentennial Queen pageant, badminton, water polo and tugs of war.   Aug....

Read More

This week in Concord history

July 28, 1776: New Hampshire militiamen are mustered atop Mount Independence, across from Fort Ticonderoga, for a reading of the Declaration of Independence, adopted earlier in the month in Philadelphia. They cheer heartily and fire a 13-gun salute.   July 28, 1927: Nellie Taylor Ross, the nation’s first woman governor, stops at the Concord home of former New Hampshire governor John G. Winant. She is on her way to Tilton, where...

Read More

This week in Concord history

July 21, 1857: The Coos Republican reports that Joseph Roby, 23, of Clarksville is struck and killed by a bolt of lightening while sitting in his house. “His cap and boots were torn in pieces, but no mark was found upon his person. Several individuals were in the house at the time, but none of the rest were injured materially.”   July 21, 1861: Col. Gilman Marston of the Second New Hampshire Volunteers is shot in the shoulder at...

Read More

This week in Concord history

July 14, 1850: On a journey into the White Mountains seeking scenes to paint, New Hampshire artist Benjamin Champney writes to a friend in Fryeburg, Maine: “To our great surprise we saw a broad and beautiful valley bounded by lofty hills and the Saco winding through it with a thousand turns and luxuriant trees interspersed. In fact we found the beau ideal of a certain kind of scenery – a combination of the wild and cultivated,...

Read More

This week in Concord history

July 7, 1816: Concord awakens to a hard freeze.   July 7, 1847: President James Polk visits Concord, prompting a parade of bands up Main Street. “The streets were alive with sightseers and from the windows, ladies greeted the president with waving handkerchiefs,” one newspaper reports.   July 8, 1822: John Bedel is born at Indian Stream Republic, now Pittsburg. Son of a general (Moody Bedel), he will gain military fame...

Read More

This week in Concord history

July 1, 1776: “The Declaration before Congress is, I think, a pretty good one,” delegate Josiah Bartlett of New Hampshire writes from Philadelphia. July 1, 1789: The Rev. Israel Evans is ordained as Concord’s second Congregationalist minister, succeeding the Rev. Timothy Walker. The town still pays the minister’s salary and living expenses. Walker, the first minister, served more than 58 years from his ordination in 1730. July 1,...

Read More

This week in Concord history

June 23, 1823: The New Hampshire Historical Society, formed earlier in the year in Portsmouth, moves to Concord. It will occupy a room in the State House for three years before moving to North Main Street near Ferry Street. June 23, 1785: A committee is appointed to lay out Main Street in Concord. A final report won’t be drafted until 1798. June 24, 2002: The state Supreme Court, casting aside partisan politics and assuming a key...

Read More

This week in Concord history

June 16, 1864: Still short of the state’s recruiting quota for the Union Army, Gov. Joseph Gilmore announces a state bonus of $400 for any man who will sign up for the First New Hampshire Cavalry Regiment.   June 17, 1840: On Concord’s Rumford Square, a five-acre field of trees between School and Center streets below Rumford Street, a speech by the Whig Sen. Daniel Webster draws a rousing crowd. The speech follows a “Log Cabin...

Read More

This week in Concord history

June 9, 1846: The cannon on Sand Hill in Concord booms the news that John Parker Hale of Dover, an anti-slavery leader, has been elected to the U.S. Senate.   June 10, 2003: In their season opener, Concord’s Quarry Dogs eke out a 3-2 win over the Sanford Mainers at Doane Diamond.   June 10, 2001: Merrimack Valley wins the Class I softball championship with a 4-1 victory over Monadnock. It’s the school’s first softball title...

Read More

This week in Concord history

June 2, 1784: New Hampshire adopts a new constitution. The title “governor,” too reminiscent of British colonial rule, is changed to “president.” To celebrate the event, a parade marches up Main Street in Concord to the Old North Church. June 2, 1819: The State House opens in Concord. The legislative session will be notable for halting the practice of state subsidy for the Congregationalist Church. June 3, 1775: A month and a half...

Read More

This week in Concord history

May 26, 1857: U.S. Sen. James Bell of New Hampshire, elected the previous year, dies in office.   May 26, 1944: After several destructive incidents, the police join school officials in urging young people not to play with handmade grenades. The grenades are filled with carriage bolts and use match-heads for the explosive charge. Children have been reported making and throwing them throughout the city.   May 27, 1727: A...

Read More

This week in Concord history

May 19, 1944: Mrs. Charles A. Morin of Monroe Street in Concord hopes a new postal policy aimed at improving communication with prisoners-of-war in Germany will bring word from her son. Lt. Antoine Robert Morin, a pilot, was shot down in February, and his mother received this note, dated Feb. 28: “Dear Folks: Am prisoner of war in Germany. Well and safe. No need for worry. Will write as often as possible. We’ll be together after...

Read More

This week in Concord history

May 5, 1944: An epidemic of German measles in Concord has driven the absentee list at city schools above 100. May 6, 2003: Gov. Craig Benson appoints a 12-person task force to determine whether the Old Man of the Mountain should be reborn as a plaster of Paris, rubber or granite version of its former self. Benson says the Old Man of the Mountain Revitalization Task Force will explore what should be done to best memorialize the New...

Read More

This week in Concord history

April 28, 1974: Gov. Mel Thomson returns to New Hampshire after two days in the Caribbean studying oil refineries. Thomson’s office refuses to say precisely where in the Caribbean area he was. April 28, 1752: On a trapping expedition north of Plymouth, young John Stark leaves camp to check his traps and is captured by Indians. He is beaten, taken north to Canada, forced to run the gauntlet and, after five or six weeks in captivity,...

Read More

This week in Concord history

April 21, 1789: When John Adams arrives at Federal Hall in New York after being elected the nation’s first vice president, he is greeted by John Langdon of New Hampshire, president pro tempore of the Senate. There is as yet no oath of office for the vice president, so Langdon simply escorts Adams to his seat at the head of the chamber.   April 21, 1881: At 6 p.m., a small closed car drawn by a horse leaves Abbot & Downing...

Read More

This week in Concord history

April 14, 1865: Edwin Bedee of Meredith, a captain in the 12th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry Regiment, goes to Ford’s Theater. He can see President Lincoln from his seat. After John Wilkes Booth jumps to the stage and flees, Bedee climbs over several rows and enters Lincoln’s box. He holds the president’s head while a surgeon searches for Lincoln’s wound. Bedee suddenly feels the president’s blood running into his hand. “Here is...

Read More

This week in Concord history

April 7, 1774: The New Hampshire Assembly, predecessor of the Legislature, reconvenes after a long hiatus. It does not immediately choose a new committee of correspondence, the vehicle by which the colonies share information about acts of Parliament, but will soon do so in response to British efforts to control the Port of Boston.   April 7, 1965: The Monitor reports on plans for a new $1.2 million state liquor store on Storrs...

Read More

This week in Concord history

March 31, 1968: Nineteen days after Sen. Eugene McCarthy captured 42 percent of the Democratic vote in the New Hampshire primary, President Lyndon B Johnson tells a national television audience: “I shall not seek, and I will not accept, the nomination of my party for another term as your president.”   April 1, 2000: Concord’s Matt Bonner gets a taste of Final Four basketball as a freshman, scoring four points and grabbing two...

Read More

This week in Concord history

March 25, 2000: Concord High defenseman Joe Garofalo has been named Division I hockey player of the year, the Monitor reports. It is the second year in a row he has won the award, which he shares this year with Bishop Guertin goalie Dave MacDonald.   March 26, 2002: A new study shows that the combined willpower of town meeting voters across New Hampshire raised more money for conservation this year than any other public or...

Read More

This week in Concord history

March 10, 1964: Absentee candidate Henry Cabot Lodge, U.S. ambassador to South Vietnam, wins the New Hampshire Republican presidential primary with 36 percent of the vote. Barry Goldwater and Nelson Rockefeller, who have campaigned hard in the state, take 22 and 21 percent respectively, and write-in Richard Nixon, the former vice president, wins 17 percent.   March 11, 1952: Sen. Estes Kefauver’s grass-roots presidential campaign...

Read More

This week in Concord history

March 3, 1972: Four days before the New Hampshire primary, 1,800 people rally for President Nixon at the armory in Manchester. Among them is Gov. Walter Peterson, who beams: “There is no doubt this is Nixon country.”   March 3, 1915: The Legislature takes a poll on Prohibition. Of Concord’s 18 state representatives, only one votes in favor. After all, that year there are 33 places in Concord where liquor can be legally sold: 13...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Feb. 24, 1976: President Gerald Ford barely defeats Ronald Reagan in the New Hampshire primary. On the Democratic side, the winner is long-shot Jimmy Carter of Georgia.   Feb. 25, 1780: Jonathan Harvey is born in Sutton. He will grow up to be president of the New Hampshire Senate in 1818, the same year his brother Matthew is speaker of the New Hampshire House.   Feb. 25, 1978: Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas comes to New Hampshire...

Read More

This week in Concord history

Feb. 17, 1740: John Sullivan is born in Somersworth. He will grow up to be a vain lawyer with British sympathies and an American Revolutionary War general, but not a good one.   Feb. 17, 1900: Deep in debt, the 96-year-old Abbot & Downing coach and wagon company is taken over by creditors. Employment has dropped from 300 to 200. The families of Lewis Downing and J. Stephens Abbot will no longer be involved in running the...

Read More

Our Newspaper Family Includes:

Copyright 2021 The Concord Insider - Privacy Policy - Copyright