Annual Monarch Festival joins streaming list

Pollinators, including a Monarch butterfly and bees, in the wildflower meadow at Cat Thomson and Steve McDonough's home in Leeds. COURTESY OF CAT THOMPSON
Pollinators, including a Monarch butterfly and bees, in the wildflower meadow at Cat Thomson and Steve McDonough's home in Leeds. COURTESY OF CAT THOMPSON
FILE - In this July 22, 2012, file photo, a Monarch butterfly eats nectar from a swamp milkweed on the shore of Rock Lake in Pequot Lakes, Minn. Milkweed has long been considered a nuisance on North American farmlands but now, more than 100 farmers in Quebec and Vermont are planting it in their fields to help restore the declining population of monarchs, which use that plant exclusively for their eggs and to feed the caterpillars. The farmers are also tapping a new market for the milkweed fibers. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt, File)  Ann Heisenfelt
FILE - In this July 22, 2012, file photo, a Monarch butterfly eats nectar from a swamp milkweed on the shore of Rock Lake in Pequot Lakes, Minn. Milkweed has long been considered a nuisance on North American farmlands but now, more than 100 farmers in Quebec and Vermont are planting it in their fields to help restore the declining population of monarchs, which use that plant exclusively for their eggs and to feed the caterpillars. The farmers are also tapping a new market for the milkweed fibers. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt, File) Ann Heisenfelt

Every September since 2013, Petals in the Pines in Canterbury has looked forward to the Monarch Festival, which attracts hundreds of people from around New Hampshire. This year, because of COVID-19, they are going to do this event online. They are excited about this opportunity because now it doesn’t matter where you live, you’ll be able to take part in the festival.

Starting at 9 a.m. on Sept. 12, they will broadcast to you from the rejuvenated and expanded pollinator meadow to open the festival via Facebook Live. There will be a variety of presentations throughout the day shown live each hour as well as pre-recorded sessions to watch at your convenience. There’ll be readings from children’s book authors, interviews to learn about the great products from Hazel Moon Botanicals and Tanglewood Hollow, and craft activities for kids. Petals in the Pines plans to include information about growing milkweed, the status of the monarch butterfly population, and how to attract monarchs and other pollinators to your yard.

Petals in the Pines at 126 Baptist Road, Canterbuy, has been working the land for over 20 years, maintaining what nature has provided us more than 7 acres of native plants, eye-catching ledge outcroppings, and a waterfall-adorned stream meandering through our woodlands, each offering their own quiet, beautiful spaces. Interconnected with these are garden beds filled with blooms and a Pick-Your-Own flower field that we nurture. In addition, we have created natural plays spaces for children in the landscape.

For more information and a schedule of the day’s presentations, visit petalsinthepines.com.

Author: Insider Staff

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