We saw a snake, skunk and bat at the library and it wasn’t in a book

If you look real close, you can see Mona Headen showing Spot, a tiger salamander, to a bunch of very interested library goers as part of Headen’s Critters ‘N Creatures presentation.
If you look real close, you can see Mona Headen showing Spot, a tiger salamander, to a bunch of very interested library goers as part of Headen’s Critters ‘N Creatures presentation.
No, we didn’t put this picture in upside down; Echo the bat just likes to hang out that way.
No, we didn’t put this picture in upside down; Echo the bat just likes to hang out that way.
Aimee, the spotted skunk, is one you wouldn’t mind being around. That’s cause she’s been de-stinked.
Aimee, the spotted skunk, is one you wouldn’t mind being around. That’s cause she’s been de-stinked.
Winter, a dark eyed white domestic ferret, shows off his dance moves for the group.
Winter, a dark eyed white domestic ferret, shows off his dance moves for the group.
Joe, Isabelle and Natalie Crevier take turns petting Lucille, a ball python.
Joe, Isabelle and Natalie Crevier take turns petting Lucille, a ball python.
Mona Headen shows a group of very interested children Kenya, a leopard tortoise.
Mona Headen shows a group of very interested children Kenya, a leopard tortoise.

Usually living animals inside a library would be a cause for concern, but not when they’re supposed to be there like last Thursday when Critters ‘N Creatures made a school vacation appearance.

Author: Tim Goodwin

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