Help keep Concord beautiful on Earth Day

From left: Concord tree crew members Ben St. Amand, Ryan Rambeau and Jon Fisher plant an American beech sapling at Blossom Hill Cemetery last year.
From left: Concord tree crew members Ben St. Amand, Ryan Rambeau and Jon Fisher plant an American beech sapling at Blossom Hill Cemetery last year.
Millie LaFontaine (left) and Pratiksha Gurung get their hands dirty planting leeks at the Birch Street Community Garden last summer. Planting stuff is a great way to spend Earth Day.
Millie LaFontaine (left) and Pratiksha Gurung get their hands dirty planting leeks at the Birch Street Community Garden last summer. Planting stuff is a great way to spend Earth Day.
There's a couple community garden spots in Concord, in case you didn't know it.
There's a couple community garden spots in Concord, in case you didn't know it.

Saturday is kind of an important day for Mother Nature.

When you get around to looking at the ol’ calendar, you’ll see that Saturday is April 22 – otherwise known as Earth Day.

If you didn’t know, the first Earth Day was organized in 1970, and in the 47 years that have passed, yearly events have been held to better the planet that we all share.

While we believe that every day is an opportunity to better the environment and do our part to keep the planet clean, there isn’t always time to plant a tree or pick up trash on the side of the road.

But instead of dwelling on all the nature related endeavors you wish you had taken part in since last Earth Day, this weekend is your chance to make up for it. Now, we fully expected to find a number of events happening all over the city to celebrate and appreciate nature scheduled for Saturday, although surprisingly that wasn’t the case.

We did find a few things that can help you get started or give you ideas (keep reading to find out more), but in reality, Earth Day can be whatever you want it to be.

For example, have you noticed a considerable amount of trash near your home or place of work? Well then, channel your inner Amy Moffett and do something about it.

We wrote about Moffett way back in December 2015. As an avid walker, Moffett would pick up trash whenever she saw it. It started as an Earth Day thing, and soon morphed into a weekly civil service.

And that could be you. The next time you decide to take a stroll, arm yourself with a trash bag, some rubber gloves – because you never know what you’ll find – and start collecting.

Once you’ve filled your bags, separate out the recyclables and make a trip to the transfer station (77 Old Turnpike Road) and dispose of it.

Another great way to take care of our environment is to leave your car parked for the day and make use of Concord’s public transportation. Since the bus system doesn’t run on the weekends, make this a priority one day during the work week. Plus, it sure will be nice to avoid driving in traffic.

But like we said before, through emails, phone calls and scouring the interwebs, we found some stuff that offers up a little more direction than just grab a trash bag and pick up litter.

Bow Men’s Club

The Bow Men’s Club is all about helping out the community. And what better way to help the town than by eliminating waste that has been discarded on the side of the road.

From 8:45 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, the club is hosting a road side cleanup throughout the town. All you have to do is show up at the Old Town Hall (91 Bow Center Road) at 8:45 a.m. to get your assignment for the morning.

There will be free donuts, coffee, orange juice and more to give you all the energy you need to pick up trash, and then head out for a leisurely walk.

Anyone is welcome to take part, and it will even earn Bow High School students some community service hours.

March for Science

The N.H. March for Science will be held on Saturday in downtown Concord.

As one of more than 425 satellite marches to the main one in Washington, D.C., the goal of the event is to encourage policymakers to rely on evidence when making big decisions.

The event begins at 9 a.m. with music and information tables, with the march taking off at 11 a.m. from the State House. It will go down Park, Green, Warren and North State streets and back to the State House, which is about three-quarters of a mile.

From noon to 2 p.m., there will be speeches, a rally, demonstrations and children’s activities.

To learn more about N.H. March for Science and the group organizing Concord and other satellite marches in the state, visit  facebook.com/nhmarchforscience.

Audubon

The Audubon McLane Center is taking part in the aforementioned March for Science and the state organization has a few events planned outside of the area.

But Ruth Smith wanted us to pass along that the Audubon always encourages people to get outside, think about how they live and use resources and reducing impact is the best way to honor the Earth – something folks can do anytime, and all the time.

As Smith put it, every day is Earth Day in our world.

Forest Society

The Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests holds a yearly event at Mt. Major in Alton. For the past several years, along with a group of volunteers, they hike Mt. Major to clean up litter from the trails and summit, along with any graffiti they find.

Concord Trails

With more than 30 trails in the city, there’s a lot of potential for trash to be strewn about. While the trails committee doesn’t have anything planned for Earth Day, they always want people to carry in and carry out. Unfortunately, that doesn’t always happen.

So if you feel like going for a hike to celebrate nature, bring a trash bag and pick up whatever you find. We were also told that the parking lots are usually a hot spot for garbage so be on the lookout.

Northern Pass Rally

On Sunday at noon, there will be a citizens-initiated event to rally for the future of the Granite State and stop the Northern Pass.

People are encouraged to arrive at noon, with a speaking program to be held at 1 p.m.

At 2 p.m., those at the rally will circle the statehouse in a sign of togetherness. Following the rally, there will be a gathering at the Capitol Center for the Arts.

Organizers urge you to wear orange, and the first 500 people to arrive will get an orange “Stop Northern Pass” baseball cap.

Arbor Day

It’s not until April 28, but it’s never too early to start preparing for our favorite tree holiday. 

Beginning at 11 a.m., the city will be hosting a ceremonial tree planting by Concord General Services at Rollins Park on Broadway.

It sure sounds like a good kickoff to spring in the city.

Author: Tim Goodwin

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