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This Week in Concord History

Nov. 1, 1819: A new animal law takes effect in Concord: "Whereas the inhabitants of Concord and travelers with teams and loaded sleighs are frequently annoyed by cows and sheep running at large, therefore hereafter no cow or sheep shall be permitted to run at-large in the Main street . . . or within half a mile to the west of Main Street."Nov. 1, 1842: The New Hampshire… 0

November 1, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Oct. 25, 1843: Col. Richard M. Johnson, the noted Kentuckian who is reputed to have killed the Indian chief Tecumseh, visits Concord. Franklin Pierce and others greet him at the station, and Johnson rides down Main Street on a white horse.At the State House, he wears the same red vest he wore in the Battle of the Thames, during which he is said to have slain Tecumseh. Eleven shots… 0

October 25, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Oct. 18, 1965: Gov. John King urges state lawmakers to approve tearing down a 70-year-old tower atop the state library at the corner of Park and North State streets. He calls it "an architectural monstrosity."Oct. 18, 1988: Attorney Ray D'Amante announces the name of Concord's soon-to-be-built mall: Steeplegate. Concord, he says, is a city of steeples and they… 0

October 18, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Oct. 11, 1854: In a closed-door meeting at Concord's Eagle Hotel, former New Hampshire congressman Edmund Burke leads a group of disenchanted Democrats who vote to repudiate President Franklin Pierce.Oct, 11, 1894: James M. Langley is born in Hyde Park, Mass. He will be the editor and publisher of the Concord Monitor for four decades, beginning in 1923. He will be instrumental… 0

October 11, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Oct. 4, 1861: A fire on the southwest corner of Main and Centre streets destroys the Merrimack House, a marble works and a doctor's home and office.Oct. 4, 1983: Chubb Life President John Swope announces his company's plans to expand, bringing 300 new employees to Concord. "This is exactly the kind of employment Concord wants," he says. "The only environmental… 0

October 4, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Sept. 27, 1967: New England College bestows honorary degrees on Dudley W. Orr, a prominent Concord lawyer, and writer and humorist Ogden Nash.Sept. 27, 2000: Dropping in on a rally for Gov. Jeanne Shaheen staged by voters with disabilities, her opponent, Gordon Humphrey, gets an earful for his 1990 vote against the Americans with Disabilities Act. By the end of the news conference,… 0

September 27, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Sept. 20, 1973: Attorney General Warren Rudman decides against pressing prosecution of anyone connected with Gov. Mel Thomson's Jan. 23 search of business profits tax records. But he declares the search was "illegal" and vows to prosecute if the tax search is repeated at any time while he is attorney general. The search had exploded into a controversy after Thomson… 0

September 20, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Sept. 13, 1976: Rochester Mayor John Shaw says he will pay a parking ticket given to Gov. Mel Thomson after a local businessman complained the governor's limousine was illegally parked. Cost of the ticket: 50 cents.Sept. 13, 1913: Harry K. Thaw, a wealthy, prominent New Yorker who murdered one of the country's foremost architects, Stanford White, arrives in Concord. Thaw… 0

September 13, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Sept. 6, 1842: The locomotive Amoskeag with a train of three passenger cars arrives in Concord at 6:45 p.m. The train, from Boston, is the first to come to the city's new depot. "As the cars came in, the multitude raised cheering shout, and the cannon pealed forth its thunder to celebrate," Bouton's history will report. Many of the onlookers were taken for a joy-ride,… 0

September 6, 2011

This Week in Concord History

Aug. 30, 1970 - At the Highway Hotel in Concord, the Freedoms Foundation of Valley Forge, Pa., honors 10 New Hampshire people for efforts to maintain "the American way." Among the honorees are Publisher William Loeb and gubernatorial candidate Meldrim Thomson Jr.•Aug. 30, 1862 - After a federal draft call for nine-month volunteers, the city of Concord offers a bounty of $100… 0

August 30, 2011