The airport issue

Jan 10, 2011
12:00 AM
Concord Fables

Wrasslin' bears just came with the territory . . .

Gather 'round the fire, kiddies, it's time for some Concord Fables. The Insider dug up stories of Concord's legendary figures, and we think these historical heroes are every bit as exciting as Daniel Boone or Davy Crockett. Those guys just had better representation. We've taken these stories, with little or no editing, straight from the pages of "The History of Concord," by Nathaniel…

Jan 10, 2011
12:00 AM

Inside the Concord Municipal Airport

Walk into the Concord Municipal Airport and it's like stepping back in time, with the buildings and many of the vintage planes on site predating World War II. Inside, though, the passion for flying is as alive as it was when Charles Lindbergh swept through the airport in 1927. Concord has had an airport since the days of World War I, but it wasn't always in its current location. In 1920,…

Jan 10, 2011
3:17 PM

So you like your beer ICE COLD?

Last Wednesday, The Barley House hosted the inaugural keg tapping of Long Trail’s Black Ice Pond Hockey Brown Ale, and the Insider was there. Maybe it’s the beer talking, but it was a lot of fun. Long Trail brewed this one-off ale in honor of Concord’s Black Ice Pond Hockey tournament, taking place on Jan. 28 – 30. Want in on some more Black Ice events? Go to the Red River Theatres on Jan. 12 and take in…

Jan 10, 2011
4:39 PM

This week in Concord history

- Jan. 11, 1943: Fred Currier, a well-known vegetable and fruit peddler in Penacook, is killed when his truck slides backward as he is unloading it and crushes him against a wall of snow on Elm Street. - Jan. 11, 1944: Because war recruitment has thinned the labor pool, the governor says he may lower the legal age for pinboys at New Hampshire bowling alleys to 15. - Jan. 11, 1860: The Governor’s Horse Guard is organized. Its members are all fine horsemen, but its purpose is as much “promoting social intercourse” as it is military. Former president Franklin Pierce and U.S. Sen. John P. Hale…

Jan 10, 2011
12:00 AM

Book of the week

It was Dec. 17, 1933, in the midst of the Depression, when B. Virdot placed an ad in the Canton, Ohio newspaper offering to give $10 to 75 people to help make their Christmas somewhat joyful. The gift was meant for those who might otherwise "hesitate to knock on charity's door for aid." Fast forward 75 years to 2008. Ted Gup, a former investigative reporter for the Washington Post, travels to surprise his mother on her 80th birthday. She presents him with a suitcase from her attic that contains family mementos Among those mementos he finds an envelope with a sheaf of letters dated Dec. 18, 1933,…

Jan 10, 2011
3:13 PM

City briefly

Every week, City Manager Tom Aspell sends out his city memo, updating us all on the comings and goings and what-have-yous around the city. Well, we didn’t run it in the Insider last week, so we combined them into a big ol’ double dose of a city memo. More food donations Aspell writes that the Concord Human Services Department received another generous donation of food this week from Concord High School students Dillon Emerson and Matt Curtis. Aspell also writes that Marty Bender from Temple Beth Jacob brought in food collected from the congregation, as well as chicken and hamburger. Many thanks…